Your pharmacy should be utilising every social networking outlet available to help gain exposure. We’ve already covered Google+ and Facebook, but the platform Twitter is equally important. Twitter hosts a variety of users from all sorts of fields. What distinguishes Twitter is its simple operation. Users are limited to text messages of 140 characters, and messages or ‘tweets’ from those they choose to follow appear on their ‘feed,’ keeping them informed and offering an array of information with the simple scroll of the mouse. Your pharmacy can use Twitter for a range of purposes, and this post will explain how you can implement the network into your customer service model.

First things first: Signing up for twitter is easy and quick. Go to https://twitter.com/, and fill out the information in the bottom right template where it says “New to Twitter? Sign Up.” You can enter your Pharmacy’s name where it says “Enter Full Name.” This will make it easier for people to find you. The next page will prompt you to create a username; this is called your ‘Twitter Handle’ and users will be able to locate you through this. When you continue, you’ll be asked to ‘follow’ some businesses to get started. The ‘tweets’ of those you follow will appear on your feed, so it would be wise to follow those that will provide relevant information on the health or pharmacy field. Once this is completed you can search for and follow as many people as you’d like. You also have options to help customise your profile, either choosing available graphics or uploading your own for a personal flair.

You can start using Twitter right away. Like your other social media accounts, you should use Twitter to keep the public informed on happenings within the store, news stories that may be of interest to them, updates to the products you carry, etc. Users will respond by ‘tweeting’ questions to you or responding to your posts. To use Twitter specifically for customer service means being aware of what the public is saying about you or asking of you. Ensure to keep constantly abreast of your ‘Mentions.’ Mentions are tweets in which your handle has been included, and these are displayed on their own separate feed for easy access.

Those on Twitter today have grown to expect responses from their tweets, especially if their enquiries are directed towards smaller businesses, like local pharmacies. Examples of questions that may be asked include anything from requests for further information on products or posts you’ve made, users wondering about your opening hours or location, enquiries about special offers, etc. The list is endless and is sure to be as diverse as the users themselves.  The important thing to remember is that answering these questions will help build your report with customers and potential customers, and is an easy way to promote your pharmacy. In the digital world of today, think of these ‘mentions’ just as you would a phone call; they should be promptly answered. It should be noted however, that like all internet platforms, once something is posted it is permanent. With this in mind, if there are questions of a delicate nature, it’s wise to urge the customer to call and speak directly to a pharmacist. As a rule, anything sensitive or possibly offensive should be kept off social media.

When you commit to Twitter (which all pharmacies should) you take on the responsibility of everything that goes with it. As stated before, those on the site have formed expectations of the businesses they follow. Twitter is all about interaction, which is why it’s essential you take advantage of every opportunity that presents itself. You want people to respond to your posts because it shows your material is resonating with them and hopefully helping them. Twitter can be a great place for marketing your pharmacy, so long as you remain on top of your game and are only posting appropriate content. Interacting with other users is offering a digital form of customer service, and will be appreciated by those asking the questions and recognised by the Twitter world in general.